Mechanical Therapy Research Lab

 

A lab dedicated to understanding the biomechanical risk factors to injury, specifically in those with lower limb amputation, during work-related performance. Human performance at work typically includes walking at varying speeds as well as lifting and carrying.

Dr. Dionne is interested in:

  1. prevention of injury to the residual lower limb (trans-tibial or trans-femoral) during performance of work-related activities in working-age adults;
  2. understanding the muscle activity or load-bearing that occurs within the residual limb inside the socket during work activity performance;
  3. understanding the bone health in the residual lower limb;
  4. comparing work performance and residual limb tissue health in those with lower limb amputation due to trauma, cancer, blood circulatory problems or diabetes;
  5. comparing work performance in those with osteomyoplastic amputation with traditional approaches;
  6. constructing a set of risk criteria that would predict or forewarn clinicians of biomechanical injury risk to the residual limb;
  7. developing intervention strategies that would expedite and improve work performance and minimize risk of injury to the residual lower limb, regardless of cause for amputation.

Lab Director:
Carol P. Dionne, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS, Cert MDT
Primary Investigator
Associate Faculty Member- Harold Hamm Diabetes Center

Contact Information:
E-mail: Carol Dionne
(405) 271-2131 Ext. 47115 (office)
(405) 271-2131 Ext. 47152 (lab)

 


PHF Study: Work-related Performance Characteristics in Men with TTAT at Risk for Residuum Injury


Performance characteristics which distinguish between men with transtibial amputation due to trauma (TTAT) who are likely to injure the residuum during work-related activities (WRAs) and those who are likely to successfully participate in the work force have yet to be identified


Purpose

The purpose of the 1-year study will be to:

1) examine the relationship between average peak load and muscle activity in specific locations on the end of the residual limb during normal and brisk walking, lift, and carry a weighted box, comparing the muscle activity with the intact limb;

2) examine changes in reports of pain during the tests in #1;

3) measure the blood biochemical markers of bone that is associated with bone loss, calcium balance and increased inflammation during one visit;

4) compare the results with the “successful “ group

5) to determine the performance characteristics which distinguish the “at-risk” group from the “successful” group.


 Who is eligible to participate in this study?

  • men with one trans-tibial (below-the-knee) amputation
  • 21-64 years old
  • feel pain and functional limitation in the residual limb during walking, lifting or carrying
  • must be able to walk etc without use of a cane, walker or crutch
  • can come to the lab for 2-3 hours, one visit


When will the study be conducted?

We will be able to conduct this study until the end of February 2016.


OCAST Study: Work Performance in Men with Trans-femoral Amputation

Many people with limb loss in the United States undergo transfemoral (above-the-knee) amputation (TFA), a permanent condition which greatly impacts productivity and quality of life. Fifty percent of those with TFA are of the working age (21-65yrs) whose number will considerably increase over the next 10 years.

However, despite advances in technology, medicine, prosthetics, and rehabilitation, MANY of those who are employable and could return to a productive life following amputation are not part of  the work force. Painful residual limb injury suffered during performance of work-related activities (WRAs) is one of the primary factors precluding work participation.  To ameliorate this problem, health care professionals need to develop the capability to predict, or detect early on, mechanisms which underlie risk of traumatic, biomechanical injury to the residual limb and translate this basic knowledge into effective clinical interventions and to prevent them for occurring. The essential first step in developing the capacity to determine the extent to which mechanisms underlying these injuries are preventable.


Purpose

The overall purpose of this study is to examine:

1) weight-bearing loads at the residual limb inside the socket;

2) muscle activity in the end of the residual limb;

3) reporting of pain during work task performance; and

4) presence and extent of indicators for bone loss and inflammation

…… in men with one-sided above the knee amputees at 2 time points, 12 months apart. The study will target normal and brisk paced walking, lifting, and carrying.


Who is eligible to participate in this study?

  • men with one trans-femoral (above-the-knee) amputation
  • 21-64 years old
  • feel sensation and have normal or well-controlled blood sugars
  • must be able to walk etc without use of a cane, walker or crutch
  • can come to the lab for 2-3 hours, two visits one year apart


When will the study be conducted?

 We will be able to conduct this study until the end of June 2018.

 

PHF Study: Work-related Performance Characteristics in Men with TTAT at Risk for Residuum Injury